iBIO https://ibio.org To promote, connect and engage the life sciences community Wed, 03 Jun 2020 12:36:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://ibio.org/wp-content/uploads/cropped-android-chrome-512x512-32x32.png iBIO https://ibio.org 32 32 Pfizer Establishes New Program to Support Continued Biotechnology Innovation https://ibio.org/pfizer-establishes-new-program-to-support-continued-biotechnology-innovation/ https://ibio.org/pfizer-establishes-new-program-to-support-continued-biotechnology-innovation/#respond Wed, 03 Jun 2020 12:36:38 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5720 Pfizer Breakthrough Growth Initiative will invest up to $500 million across a portfolio of clinical-stage biotechnology companies

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) announced the establishment of the Pfizer Breakthrough Growth Initiative, through which Pfizer will invest up to $500 million in biotechnology companies to help provide funding and access to Pfizer’s scientific expertise to ensure continuity of the biotechnology companies’ most promising clinical development programs.

“There has never been a more important moment to pursue new collaborations in our industry,” said John Young, Pfizer’s Chief Business Officer. “The Pfizer Breakthrough Growth Initiative seeks to do just this by injecting crucial capital into biotechnology companies that share our commitment to delivering transformative therapies for patients.”

The Pfizer Breakthrough Growth Initiative will focus on making non-controlling equity investments in clinical-stage public companies, with a primary focus on companies with small- to medium-sized market capitalizations across a range of therapeutic categories that are consistent with Pfizer’s core areas of focus: Internal Medicine, Inflammation & Immunology, Oncology, Rare Disease, Vaccines and Hospital. Partner companies may also have the opportunity to access Pfizer’s significant expertise and resources in research, clinical development and manufacturing.

Today’s announcement builds on Pfizer’s long history of successfully collaborating across the healthcare innovation ecosystem, through a wide range of flexible partnering and funding models, with the shared goal of turning great science into innovative new medicines.

Biotechnology companies interested in learning more may contact pbgi@pfizer.com.

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Return to Work: D3 Clean https://ibio.org/return-to-work-d3-clean/ https://ibio.org/return-to-work-d3-clean/#respond Fri, 29 May 2020 13:31:38 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5713 Improving Workplace Safety as We Return to the Office

In an effort to help businesses as they plan to reopen following Coronavirus shutdowns, iBIO and BIO’s Partner, Clean Harbors, has launched a new program: “D3 Clean – Disinfection. Decontamination. Disposal.” As the top decontamination and hazardous waste disposal company in North America, Clean Harbors is proud to offer their customers a sense of confidence with routine and ongoing deep cleaning services and options that no other service provider can match.

BIO Business Solutions® is the largest cost savings purchasing program for the biotech industry, operated by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). BIO leverages the purchasing power of the industry to negotiate with top suppliers to secure exceptional savings, favorable terms, and superior service for members. iBIO Members can participate for no charge as a benefit of their membership and to save on items they need to run a successful biotechnology enterprise

Learn more at https://www.bio.org/save/inquiry-form

 

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iBIO EDUCATE Transforms Annual STEMgirls Camp into a Virtual Experience for Families https://ibio.org/ibio-educate-transforms-annual-stemgirls-camp-into-a-virtual-experience-for-families/ https://ibio.org/ibio-educate-transforms-annual-stemgirls-camp-into-a-virtual-experience-for-families/#respond Wed, 13 May 2020 11:48:25 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5624 iBIO EDUCATE, dedicated to inspiring the next generation of innovators and helping restore America’s leadership in technology education, today announced that it has extended the deadline to register for its STEMfamily camp until May 22nd. iBIO EDUCATE and its partners will conduct the new, family-centered, internet-based experiential program June 22nd – 26th, 2020.

STEMfamily Camp is a free virtual camp that offers hands-on experiments that are designed for the whole family to enjoy and investigate. Click here to learn more and register for STEMfamily Camp. Registration ends May 22nd.

The online camp will offer hands-on STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) activities that help families explore a range of STEM fields and careers.. Camp topics will include food science/nutrition, electrical engineering, agriculture, polymer science, bioengineering and chemistry. Prior to beginning each day’s program, camp participants will read and/or watch content that will help them prepare for the curriculum and learn about real-life employment opportunities.

Starting the morning of June 22nd, registered families will login to the camp’s website to kick-off each daily activity, access resources and interact with program leaders. In addition to providing generous financial support, Abbott, Astellas and Horizon, three prominent Illinois-based life sciences companies, will provide content on STEM careers and participate in panel discussions. These companies not only recognize the critical importance of early outreach to developing STEM talent and encouraging diversity in the STEM workplace, they also are providing resources and expert presenters to make the camp successful.

“The COVID-19 crisis highlights the need for talented and passionate leaders in STEM fields. The need for social distancing challenged us to transform the extremely popular and successful STEMgirls Camp into a new experience that will flourish in the virtual world and ensure that we fulfil our commitment to the community,” said Ann Vogel, senior vice president of iBIO . “We are confident that STEMfamily Camp will meet that challenge, with the added benefit of now involving the entire family. We could not have made this happen without the extraordinary financial and program support of our partners.”

iBIO will provide materials and supplies for families in the North Chicago/Waukegan, Ill., area. To encourage participation by families of need, Illinois residents that do not currently have hi-speed WiFi and would like to participate in the camp’s broadband access program should indicate their interest when they register before May 22nd. To ensure that the cost of broadband access is not a financial obstacle to participating in STEMfamily Camp, iBIO has partnered with Comcast to provide six months of free internet service for families in financial need.

Another iBIO partner for STEMfamily Camp is the Warhawk Summer Up!, a program that connects middle and high school students in North Chicago.  “Our program helps local youth – middle, high school and alumni – learn new concepts and develop work experiences that build skills and transform futures,” said KeOne Carter, program coordinator, Warhawk Summer Up!  “The STEMfamily Camp is the type of program we need in these times and in our community. We are pleased to work closely with iBIO to bring a week of family fun and learning to our neighbors.”

Click here to learn more and register for STEMfamily Camp. Registration ends May 22nd.

 

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DAY 5 Title https://ibio.org/day-5-title/ https://ibio.org/day-5-title/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 14:33:30 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5587

Materials

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  • aaa

Introduction Text

Explains the objective of the activity, time frame for each part, suggested age range for each part 

Background Reading

Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. Background reading to create context. 

Written Procedure

Written procedure for each part.Written procedure for each part.Written procedure for each part.Written procedure for each part.Written procedure for each part.

What Happened?

If applicable what happened?

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Diaper Polymers https://ibio.org/day-4-title/ https://ibio.org/day-4-title/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 14:32:58 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5588

Materials

What you need for THURSDAY:

For each camper:
Four medicine cups
One gallon sized baggie
A different brand of diaper (if there is only one camper-there will be two diapers so that a comparison can be made.)

To share:
Bag of Mystery Polymer A
Bag of Mystery Polymer B
Bag of Mystery Polymer C
Measuring cups from your kitchen
Newspaper, large plastic garbage bag or another material to cover your workspace and make cleaning up easier
Salt
Spoon
Scissors

Introduction

Objectives: 
To define what a hydrogel is and how it is used.
To explain how hydrogel monomer units interact to form hydrogel polymers.
To develop and refine observation skills and to generate questions.
To investigate the physical and chemical properties of a hydrogel.

Time Required:
Part 1: 20 minutes
Part 2: 30 minutes
Part 3: 20 minutes

Age Range:
Part 1: Grades 3-8 independently
Part 2: Grades 3-6 with guidance; Grades 7-8 independently
Part 3: Grades 3-8 independently

Background Reading

Background: What is a polymer?
Exerpted from Brittanica Kids https://kids.britannica.com/students/article/polymer/276496

Exerpted from Kids Encyclopedia Facts. https://kids.kiddle.co/Polymer

The term polymer is a composite of the Greek words “poly” and “meros”, meaning “many parts.” Polymers are large molecules made of small, repeating molecular building blocks called monomers. The process by which monomers link together to form a molecule of a relatively high molecular mass is known as polymerization.  Many polymer molecules are like chains where the monomer units are the links. Polymer molecules can be straight-chains or they can have cross-linking between chains.

Polymers make up many of the materials in living organisms. Proteins are polymers of amino acids, cellulose is a polymer of sugar molecules, and nucleic acids such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are polymers of nucleotides. Many synthetic materials, including nylon, paper, plastics, and rubbers, are also polymers.   

A variety of simple molecules join together to become useful polymers. The nonstick cookware coating known as Teflon, for example, is made of a monomer composed of two atoms each of fluorine and carbon. Both Plexiglas and Lucite are made of methyl methacrylate, an organic monomer composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Silicon polymers used for sealants and other applications are made from inorganic monomers that contain silicon atoms.

Hydrogels are man-made substances that absorb water and hold it in the form of a gel. They’re used in disposable diapers, sanitary pads, breast pads, wound dressings, breast implants, and contact lenses. Hydrogels are also used to thicken products such as bubble bath and lotions and give them a silky, moisturizing feel.   

Today, we will be looking at the polymers that make cross-linking chains and are able to hold water.  They are called super-absorbant polymers (SAP) and hydrogels. 

Do some additional research by exploring “Polymer Science Learning Center” https://www.pslc.ws/macrog/kidsmac/basics.htm

 

Dissecting a Diaper to Investigate Polymers

Part A: EXPLORE: What is a polymer?

What are hydrogel polymers like?  Let’s explore!  You have three hydrogel polymers to investigate.  Follow the directions to do controlled observations of each of the three polymers.

To share:
Mystery Polymer A
Mystery Polymer B
Mystery Polymer C
Four medicine cups
Water

Procedure:

  1. Separate three medicine cups.  Pour mystery polymer A into the first medicine cup.  Pour mystery polymer B into the second medicine cup.  Put the mystery polymer C in to the third. Each of these is a type of hydrogel polymer.
  2. Make your observations about each of the powders in your data chart.  You should record what you SEE, what you SMELL, what you FEEL, what it SOUNDS like when you touch it and move it around.
  3. Use the fourth medicine cup to add water to each of the cups.  What are your observations as you add the water.  Add more water.  What happens?  Allow the polymer to sit in the water for 5 minutes.  Make your observations again.  Has anything changed?  
  4. The powders have properties that make them useful for different things.  One of the polymers is Instant Snow. One of the polymers is used by florists because it releases water slowly to provide water to flowers.   One of the polymers is used in diapers.  Which powder is which?

Part B: DISSECT: What is the anatomy of a diaper?

To dissect means to separate something into pieces in order to study its internal parts.  

A diaper has been designed to keep a baby dry by keeping moisture away from a baby’s skin.  The hydrogel most commonly used in diapers is sodium polyacrylate.  It’s added to the core of disposable diapers to soak up urine. This helps to prevent diaper rash.   The diaper is also designed to prevent urine from leaking out of the diaper to keep the baby’s clothing dry.  The anatomy of the diaper is a good example of chemistry and engineering working together to solve a problem.  Let’s dissect the diaper and analyze the design!

For each camper:
One gallon sized baggie
One medicine cup (reuse the a medicine cup from Part A)
A brand diaper (if there is only one camper-there will be two brands of diapers to be compared.)
Scissors

To share:
Newpaper, large plastic garbage bag or another material to cover your workspace and make cleaning up easier

Procedure:

  1. Cover your workspace with newspaper or by a large, plastic garbage bag.  This will make cleaning up easier later.
  2. Place a new diaper on the newly covered surface.
  3. Make a drawing of the diaper design.   Why was it designed this way?  Label your observations about the construction.  
  4. Look carefully at the lining.  Make some observations about the material used to make the diaper.  What does it look like?  How does it feel?
  5. Carefully cut through the diaper lining and remove all of the stuffing material.
  6. Put all of the stuffing material into your gallon sized plastic bag.  Scoop up any material that may have fallen onto your work surface and put it into the plastic bag.
  7. Seal the bag. Open a small area and blow some air into the bag so that the bag puffs up a little bit.
  8. Shake the bag for a few minutes.  You will begin to see that a powder begins to gather in the bottom of the bag.  This is the super absorbent polymer powder.
  9. Open the bag and while it is still inside the bag, begin to pull apart the cotton.  This will help to release any other polymer that is trapped in the cotton.  
  10. Continue to pull at the cotton until you are certain that the majority of the polymer has been released and is now at the bottom of the plastic bag.
  11. Remove the cotton from the bag.  Use the medicine cup to measure the amount of polymer removed from the diaper.  Record this amount in your data chart.
  12. If you have a second diaper, you will need to repeat this procedure again to collect the polymer.  Record this amount in your data chart.

How It’s Made: Disposable Diapers  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6GBfrJd2hs

Part C: INVESTIGATE: Do different brands of diapers absorb different amounts of water?

There are many brands of diapers.  When we dissected your diaper.  You can test this out!  You have just removed the sodium polyacrylate from each of the different brands diapers.   We want to test our question in a scientific way.  This means that we need to do EXACTLY THE SAME THING to the polymer from each diaper.  

For each camper:
The polymer that has been removed from the diaper.
Gallon sized plastic bag

To share:
Measuring cups from your kitchen (optional)
Salt
Spoon

Procedure:
We want to know how much water is absorbed by each brand of diaper.  You will be deciding on your own method for testing the different diaper brands.  How can we test the polymers in a scientific way?

  1. Put your polymer into its gallon bag.  Make sure that you label your bag, so that you remember which diaper you are testing.  
  2. You will be pouring water into the gallon bag a little bit at a time and mix.  Decide on how much water you will add each time.  We suggest you add 30ml at a time.  You can measure this easily with your medicine cup.  If you have measuring cups in your kitchen that you can use, you can measure a different amount each time.  But REMEMBER:  You will need to add water EXACTLY THE SAME WAY WITH EACH DIAPER.  Keep track of how much water you add to the bag by recording it in your data chart.
  3. Each time you add water, you will need to mix it with the powder.  You will need to do this EXACTLY THE SAME WAY WITH EACH DIAPER.
  4. Continue to add water to the powder in the bag until the powder can no longer hold any more water.  If you see liquid water in the bag after mixing it with the powder, that will tell you when to stop.  However, you will need to check with one another until you agree that you are done.  You will need to see EXACTLY THE SAME WAY WITH EACH DIAPER.
  5. When you are done, add up the total amount of water added.  Which diaper brand absorbed the most?

 

To safely clean up the polymer:
Add a few teaspoon of salt, stir it with a spoon, and watch what happens. Salt messes up the gel’s water-holding abilities. When you’re finished, you can pour the saltwater goo safely down the drain.

 

What Happened?

How do we set up an investigation scientifically?

Whenever we do a science experiment, we follow certain steps to make sure that the experiment will be fair and that it will test what we want it to test. For example: We did an experiment to test whether different brands of diapers hold different amounts of water.  We wanted to make sure that our results were just from the brand of diaper and not from some other factor. 

When we tested the effect of the diaper brand on the amount of water it can hold, we tested several brands of diaper. The brand of diaper is our manipulated variable. All other variables, (the sodium polyacrylate, the size of the baggie, the way you added the water) would remain the same and we’d call them constants. They have to stay the same for the experiment to be a fair and accurate test. You can imagine what would happen if we just poured some water in the bag for one diaper and didn’t do the same for the second diaper. Or if we mixed the water in the bag for diaper 1 and didn’t mix it in the other bag for diaper 2. We might lose track of the amount of water. The responding variable in this experiment was the amount of water the polymer could absorb. This variable is what we want to observe and record.  This makes the comparison more useful to a consumer!

What is happening when we add water to the powder in the diaper?

The sodium polyacrylate is an SAP or superabsorbant polymer.  As a polymer, it is a long chain of repeating molecules called monomers.  Superabsorbant polymers expand when water is added because the water is pulled into the polymer.  The water sticks to the long chains so the sodium polyacrylate acts like a giant sponge.  Some SAPs can absorb more than 500 times their weight in water!   

The polymer is spread out in the center of the diaper using the cotton fibers that you dissected out of the diaper.  This will make sure that the water is absorbed evenly across the diaper.  Otherwise, as the baby filled the diaper, the diaper would get lumpy and uncomfortable for the baby to wear.  Even the smallest amount of powder will hold a lot of water so the diaper design will help to keep the baby dry.

The polymers in diapers can be a problem if we don’t remember that the powders are so absorbant!  A diaper that is worn in a swimming pool will quickly absorb lot of water.  If they fill too much, the diaper will break open and the polymer will leak into the pool water.  This is not good for the filtering system of the pool.  Some people will flush diapers down the toilet.  What do you think will happen as diaper moves with the water through the pipes?

 

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Simple Circuit https://ibio.org/day-3-title/ https://ibio.org/day-3-title/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 14:32:28 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5589

Materials

What you need for WEDNESDAY:

For each camper:
2 ft of copper tape
1 lithium battery
Set of three LED stickers
Toilet paper tube or paper towel tube
2 AA batteries
Battery holder
Two 1 ft pieces of insulated copper wire
1 holiday light with end stripped
1 plastic or paper cup (recommend 9oz)
2 brass brads
Clear acetate sheet or sheet protector

To share:
Markers
Construction paper
Duct tape
Aluminum foil
Roll of electrical tape
Scissors
Utility knife (For use ONLY with adult supervision)
Paper clips

Introduction

Objectives: 
To build and test a simple circuit using copper tape, LED stick on lights, and a battery.
To build a simple circuit to make a working flashlight.
To build a switch control the flow of electricity in your flashlight

Time Required:
Part 1: 20-30 minutes
Part 2: 40 minutes
Part 3: 20 minutes

Age Range:
Part 1: Grades 3-6 with guidance; Grades 7-8 independently
Part 2: Grades 3-8 with guidance
Part 3: Grades 3-8 with guidance

Background Reading

ELECTRICITY
What do TVs, cell phones, light bulbs, and even cars have in common? They are just a few things we use everyday that require electricity. In this technological age, it’s become nearly impossible to get through a day without electricity.  Scientists have studied electricity for hundreds of years. But it was not until the early 1800s that they learned how to create a continuous flow of electricity and then to channel that electricity through the use of a circuit.

CIRCUIT
But how does the electricity get to where we need it? Electricity, which is a type of energy, flows on a circuitA circuit is a complete path around which electricity can flow.  When electric current flows, it can be used by electrical appliances, such as light bulbs.  An electric circuit has to have a power source, wires for the electricity to flow through, and a device such as a lamp or a motor that uses the electric current. All three of these parts must be connected so that the current continues to flow. 

  1. POWER: In small portable devices such as flashlights, a battery supplies the power. In a home or school most devices take power from the electricity supplied by the public power plant. Current moves around the circuit from the positive terminal of a battery, to the negative terminal.
  2. CONDUCTOR: Wires made of metal and covered in plastic carry the electricity around the circuit.  Materials that allow electric current to flow through them easily are called conductors. Metal is a good conductor of electricity, which means it can pass along the wire easily and well. The plastic around the wire insulates the electricity. The electricity is very powerful, and the plastic keeps it contained so that it does not harm people or other objects.
  3. DEVICE: A device, like a bulb or a motor, will utilize the current to do some work. For instance, a bulb will use the electricity to generate light.   A motor will use the electrical current to spin and move a mixer or blender in the kitchen. 

OPEN AND CLOSED CIRCUITS
For a circuit to work, all of its parts must be connected. When all of the parts are connected, the circuit is closed and current moves freely. If the circuit is complete, it is called CLOSED.  In a closed circuit, electric current can flow and the device will receive power and will work. 

When a part is not connected, the circuit is OPEN and the current stops.  If the path is broken, the current stops  and the device will not work. Electric circuits often have switches that allow people to control the flow of the electric current through the circuit. Flipping on a lamp switch closes its circuit. This allows current to flow freely and the lamp to light up. Turning off the switch breaks, or opens, the circuit—the flow of current stops and the lamp shuts off.

Procedure

Part A: EXPLORE: Making a simple circuit that WORKS!

What is a circuit?
A circuit is a complete path around which electricity can flow.  An electric circuit has to have a power source, a conductor for the electricity to flow through, and a device, such as a light, that uses the electric current. 

We are going to create a circuit to light an LED.  Our battery will be connected to the LED using copper tape and the LED will be connected back to the battery using a second piece of copper tape.  Electricity only flows in loops. Your copper tape is made of metal so it is a great conductor of electricity.   This flow of electricity, called current, will cause the LED light to turn on and shine.

Here’s what each camper will need:
2 ft of copper tape (conductor)
1 lithium battery (power)
Set of three LED stickers (device)

Here’s what you will share:
Markers
Construction paper
Scissors

Procedure:

  1. Turn to the template on your Engineering worksheet.  We will be using the corner of the worksheet, so you may need to turn your page upside down to build your circuit.
  2. Locate the two gray lines on your template. Measure and cut two pieces of copper tape to match the length of the gray lines. 
  3. Peel the sticker off the tape and stick the foil tape over the gray lines on the template.  Both pieces of  copper tape must remain intact. When turning corners, you should fold the tape rather than cut it.   A connection works best when made with a continuous strip of tape.
  4. Stick the LED sticker onto the foil, over the picture on the template.  
  5. Fold the page corner along the dotted line and place the battery “+” side up over the “-” circle.
  6. Fold the corner flap over so that the foil on the red circle touches the “+” of the battery. The light should turn on!!!

Extension:
You have leftover copper tape and two additional LED lights.  Design a NEW simple circuit pattern that will also light an LED.  You can make it look like a heart, or a butterfly or a robot.  You could use construction paper to make a card and make the card light up!

There are some great ideas and templates at https://chibitronics.com/educators/ as well as some kits that would help you to learn more about circuits and programming circuits to do other tasks.

POST PICTURES OF YOUR WORKING CIRCUIT AND/OR THE CIRCUIT PATTERN OF YOUR OWN DESIGN ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE TO SHARE!

Part B: BUILD: Making a simple circuit flashlight

What can we make with a simple circuit?

A FLASHLIGHT!!!

Remember that a simple circuit is just a complete path around which electricity can flow.  If you look inside a flashlight, it has batteries as a power source, copper wiring as the conductor for the electricity to flow through, and a bulb as the device that uses the electric current to light up.  

Since you already know how to make a circuit that lights an LED, let’s put that knowledge to use to transfer our simple circuit into a tube!

In this case, you will be following a set of “blue prints” to build your simple flashlight.  You will need to look at the diagram to help you to assemble your flashlight. You may use the order suggested below, OR you can build it in your own order, OR you can use the basic design, but make it in your own way. 

Here’s what each camper will need:
Toilet paper tube or paper towel tube
2 AA batteries
Battery holder
Two 1 ft pieces of insulated copper wire
1 holiday light with end stripped
1 plastic cup
Clear acetate sheet or sheet protector

Here’s what you will share:
Markers
Construction paper
Duct tape
Aluminum foil
Roll of electrical tape
Scissors
Utility knife (ADULTS ONLY)
Paper clips

Suggested Order:

  1. Make your simple circuit first. 
    1. Attach one wire to one side of the light bulb by twisting the copper wires together. 
    2. Use a piece of black electrical tape to cover the exposed wire.
    3. Repeat on the other side of the light bulb with the second wire.  Cover with tape.
    4. Take the other end of one of the wires and attach it to a wire that is attached to the battery holder by twisting the copper wires together.  If you do not have enough copper wire exposed, you may need to peel off some of the plastic.  
    5. Use a piece of black electrical tape to cover the exposed wire.
    6. Repeat on the other side of the battery holder with the second wire.  Cover with tape.
    7. You should now be able to SEE a complete circuit, even though it is not lighting up.
    8. Test the circuit by putting the batteries in the battery holder.  If it lights, you have made a closed circuit!  Congratulations!  Now take the battery out so that we do not drain it while we build the rest of the flashlight.
    9. If it does not light up, it means you have an open circuit.  Open circuits do not light!  This is where you will need to TINKER.  Check each of your junctions (where the wires are twisted together).  Make sure that the copper is touching the copper so that the electricity will flow.  Play with your materials until you can get the bulb to light.  And don’t give up!  It may take some patience to get it to work
    10. Once you know the circuit works, remove the batteries.
  2. Make the tube assembly second.
    1. Cut the tube in half.  Use duct tape to create a hinge on one side of the tube so that you can open and close the tube.  Putting duct tape on the inside and outside will prevent the tube from coming apart later.  You can use a small piece of duct tape to hold the other side closed, but still allow you to open the tube when you need to.
    2. Open the tube so that it looks like the blueprint.  Use a marker to draw the lines for the circuit inside the tube.  This will make it easier to arrange the wires, battery holder and light bulb when you do your final assembly.
    3. Optional: Decorate the outside of the tube with construction paper or other materials you may have at home.
  3. Put the circuit into the tube.
    1. Use the lines you have drawn in the cardboard tube to arrange your circuit.
    2. Use duct tape to secure the battery holder in one side of the tube.
    3. Tape down the wires in the toilet paper tube as shown in the diagram.
    4. The light bulb will need to be in the center of the tube, so do not tape it directly on the toilet paper tube.
    5. Open and close the tube so that you know that the circuit will not fall apart.
  4. Add the cup to direct the light.
    1. Punch a hole in the bottom of the cup with a pen or pencil.  If you are using a plastic cup, be slow and gentle so that you do not split the cup.  Make the hole large enough that the light bulb will extend through and will be held in place by the cup.
    2. If it fits, put the bottom of the cup inside the plastic tube and secure it in place with duct tape.
    3. If the cup does not fit inside the tube, secure the cup at the top of the tube with duct tape.
    4. Make sure that the tube will open and close.  You may have to trim the cup or the tube so that it fits smoothly.
    5. Optional:  You may choose to line the inside of the cup with foil to magnify the intensity of the light.
  5. Put the batteries in the battery holder and see if your flashlight works!!!!

POST PICTURES OF YOUR WORKING FLASHLIGHT ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE TO SHARE!

Part C: EXTEND YOUR DESIGN: Making a switch for your flashlight

What is a switch?
A switch is a component which controls the open-ness or closed-ness of an electric circuit. They allow control over current flow in a circuit without having to actually get in there and manually cut or splice the wires. 

A switch is an important component in our flashlight circuit because it will allow us to turn the flashlight on and off without having to open the flashlight to insert or remove the batteries.

Here’s what you will share:
2 copper brads
Paper clips
Electrical tape
Aluminum foil
Roll of electrical tape
Duct tape
Scissors
Utility knife

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Plant Life Cycle – Life Science Investigation https://ibio.org/day-2-title/ https://ibio.org/day-2-title/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 14:31:36 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5591

Materials

What you need for TUESDAY:

For each camper:
Plastic jewelry bag
2 ft piece of yarn or string
Two cotton balls
2 corn seeds
water

To share:
3 plastic 4 oz cups
3 plastic 9 oz cups
Two peat pellets
3 – 6 in pieces of cotton or polyester clothes line OR 6 in strips of felt
6 Wisconsin Fast Plant Seeds
12 Fertilizer Pellets
3 Wooden Skewers
Water
3 sandwich baggies
A location directly below a light source
Ruler

Optional:  for making a “time lapse” station
Paper 
Markers
Tape

Introduction

Objectives: 
You will set up short-term observations of seed germination. 
You will build a self-watering growth system.
You will plant and grow Brassica rapa Wisconsin Fast Plants in order to observe the entire life cycle of a plant.

Time Required:
Part 1: 30 minutes
Part 2: 20-30 minutes
Part 3: 20 minutes (extra time to set up a time lapse station)
Part 4: 10-15 minutes every other day for approximately 40 days.

These estimations may be longer depending on the age of campers.
Remember to take pictures of your plant growth so that you can share them!
If you are inclined, you can set up a “time lapse station” for the life cycle of your plant and take daily pictures of your plants.  At the end you can make a movie from the photos!

Age Range:
Part 1: Grades 3-6 with guidance;  Grades 7-8 independently
Part 2: Grades 3-6 with guidance; Grades 7-8 independently
If setting up THREE chambers seems to be too excessive, try setting up only TWO chambers: No fertilizer pellets and 3 fertilizer pellets.
Part 3: Daily monitoring will initially require guidance for all, but may become independent with practice.

 

Background Reading

Excerpted from “Bean Beginnings” (©2011 Ball Horticultural Company and W. Atlee Burpee Company) and Wisconsin Fast Plants at fastplants.org

Plants are nearly everywhere. You can walk through a forest, drive down a road, view fields planted with crops for food, even explore a city park that is lined with trees or weeds poking through cracks in the sidewalk. Plants come in all different sizes and shapes and they grow in a variety of environments from the cold North to the heat of the Tropics. Scientists estimate that at least 260,000 different species of plants live on Earth today. 

Plants are living organisms. Living organisms have life cycles. The first part of the life cycle is the seed.  A seed may not appear to be alive, but it is a small embryonic plant covered by a seed coat.  Plants that have seeds are found in a variety of climates and conditions. A typical seed has three basic parts: an embryo, the seed coat and a temporary food supply. The food supply is packed inside the seed coat and wraps around the embryo. The embryo is a “baby” plant. It will develop, under the right conditions, into a new plant.  Have you ever watched a seed grow?  

In this activity, you will be able to set up the germination of corn seeds so that you can watch them grow in their first few days.  During these first few days, the seeds use up the food supply in the seed.  

Once leaves emerge from the seed, plants begin making their own food through a process called photosynthesis, using energy from the sun and matter from the air and water. Plants also use nutrients that they obtain from the soil to live. If you have ever added fertilizer to a houseplant or garden, then you were adding nutrients to help a plant. If nutrients are used by plants to help plants be healthier, are more nutrients better? If you want a plant to be really healthy, should you add all the fertilizer you can to its soil? 

Farmers face this question each growing season. If farmers double the amount of fertilizer normally applied to their crops, will the yield be increased enough to cover the costs of the additional fertilizer? Fertilizer is expensive, and using too much will cost too much. In addition, putting too much fertilizer on plants may hurt the environment. If the plant does not use all of the fertilizer then the extra nutrients are washed into lakes. This causes algae to grow too fast and may kill animals that live in the water. On the other hand, under-fertilized plants may not grow well and the farm may not have enough crops to remain in business. 

Choosing the best amount of fertilizer to apply to crops is a critical decision that farmers and gardeners must make.  Using fertilizer pellets provides nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Too few pellets produce shorter plants with pale yellow or reddish leaves and few flowers. Using too many fertilizer pellets produces taller plants with more leaves and more branching and slightly delayed flower production. Adding even more pellets can poison the soil and cause severely stunted plants or death due to the build-up of salt in the soil. Plants will produce a maximum yield of seed under optimal (best) fertilizer levels.  

In this investigation, you will be able to investigate the amount of fertilizer that is best for plant growth and observe the complete life cycle of your plant. Notes on Fertilizer and Nutrients:  (From: Wisconsin Fast Plants https://fastplants.org/)

Plants require an array of nutrients for growth, repair, and proper function. A nutrient is considered essential to growth if the plant cannot complete its life cycle without it, and the nutrient forms part of any critical molecule or constituent of the plant. Though micronutrients are important to healthy plant growth and function, the major nutrients needed by Wisconsin Fast Plants™ are nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). 

  • Nitrogen A – component of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and chlorophyll. 
    • Optimum: Plants are rich green and protein content increases. 
    • Deficient: Plants are stunted and light green in color; lower leaves are yellow, stem is slender. 
    • Excessive: Plants have very lush foliage with sappy, soft stems; flowering is delayed. 
  • Phosphorus A – component of the energy-mediating compounds ADP and ATP, nucleic acids, and phospholipids. 
    • Optimum: P stimulates root formation and growth, giving the plants a vigorous start; P also stimulates flowering and aids in seed formation. 
    • Deficient: Plants have slower growth and delayed flower and pod development; leaves are dark green and dull; root system is poor with little branching; stem is slender. 
    • Excessive: Plants have very lush foliage with sappy, soft stems; flowering is delayed. 
  • Potassium – Involved in protein synthesis and in the opening and closing of stomata; essential to the formation and translocation of starches and sugars. 
    • Optimum: K imparts increased vigor and disease resistance. 
    • Deficient: Leaves can be mottled or chlorotic; small necrotic spots may appear between veins or near leaf tips and margins; flowers do not achieve vibrant yellow color; stem is slender. 
    • Excessive: Plants have dark foliage and stiff stems and leaf branches.

Plant Life Cycle – Life Science Investigation

Adapted from “Bean Beginnings” (©2011 Ball Horticultural Company and W. Atlee Burpee Company) and Wisconsin Fast Plants at fastplants.org

 

EXPLORE: Make a Germination Necklace

Materials:

For each camper:
Plastic jewelry bag
2 ft piece of yarn or string
Two cotton balls
2 corn seeds
water

Seeds will develop, under the right conditions, into a new plant.  Have you ever watched a seed grow?  We are going to create a live corn necklace, which you will care for and observe as it grows. If you want to, you can use two corn varieties—so that you can observe and compare them as they germinate.

  1. You should have two corn seeds. Draw a picture of and provide a written description of each seed.
  2. Get one plastic “jewelry” bag, two cotton balls, a piece of yarn or string, and a cup of water.
  3. Dip the two cotton balls in the water so that they are completely wet but not dripping wet. Too much water will keep the seeds from germinating (sprouting), because the conditions will not be right!
  4. Place the cotton balls in the plastic bag.  Make sure that the cotton fills up the plastic bag almost to the top.
  5. Place one corn seed on one side of the cotton ball so that it is held in place between the plastic and the cotton ball about halfway up the bag.
  6. Place the second corn seed on one the other side of the cotton ball so that it is held in place between the plastic and the cotton ball about halfway up the bag.
  7. Seal the bag so that there is air in the bag, but that it is not blown up like a balloon.
  8. Create a small hole in the bag ABOVE the seal.  String the yarn through the hole in the jewelry bag. 10. Tie a knot in the end of the string to form a necklace.

  1. The necklace can be worn inside your shirt so that your body heat will keep the seeds warm.  You can hang it someplace else, but it will grow much more slowly.
  2. Each day, at about the same time, use a ruler to measure the length of roots and leaves as they grow.
  3. Observe, measure, and collect data on the corn plant germination and growth for at least a week. It is possible that the cotton ball may become dry. If so, add a little more water to wet the cotton ball, but do not add so much that there is excess water in the bag, and seal it securely.
  4. When you are done, you can plant your corn in a pot of soil and put it outside.  If you care for it by watering and fertilizing , the plant will continue to grow and it may produce a cob of corn!

Build: Self-Watering Growth Chamber

Materials to share:
3 plastic 4oz cups
3 plastic 9 oz cups
Two peat pellets
3 – 6 in pieces of cotton or polyester clothes line OR 6 in strips of felt
6 Wisconsin Fast Plant Seeds
6 toothpicks
9 Fertilizer Pellets
Bowl of Water
3 sandwich baggies
A location directly below a light source
Ruler

Optional:  For making a “time lapse” station
Paper
Markers
Tape

In this investigation, you will be able to investigate the amount of fertilizer that is best for plant growth and observe the complete life cycle of your plant.  If setting up THREE chambers seems to be too excessive, try setting up only TWO chambers: No fertilizer pellets and 3 fertilizer pellets

  1. Fill a medium sized bowl with water.  Place the two peat pellets into the water.  They will begin to expand.  Leave them for 5-10 minutes.  Place the three 6-inch pieces of clothesline (or felt strips) into the bowl of water to soak.

Mark the Water Reservoir

  1. Find the three 9oz plastic cups.  These cups will be your water reservoirs.  Put your ruler into the cup and measure 5cm from the bottom of the cup.  Use a sharpie to make a mark.  This is your waterline. Do the same thing in the other two cups.
  2. Fill each of the three cups to the water line that you just made.  Set them off to the side and out of the way.

Making the Growth Cups

  1. Find the three 4 oz cups.  These will be the growth cups.  Label one cup “No Fertilizer.”  Label the second cup “3 Fertilizer.”  Label the third cup “6 fertilizer”.
  2. Use a push pin to make a hole on the bottom of each 4oz plastic cup.  Again, be patient.  You do not want to split the cup. This hole will need to be made bigger so that it is wide enough that you will be able to thread the cotton clothesline (or felt strip) through it.  Gently move the push pins to make a bigger hole.  
  3. Find your three 6-inch sections of clothesline or felt strips.  This is called the wick.  It will be used to draw the water up from the water reservoir. 
  4. Thread the wick through the hole on the bottom of each cup so that half of the wick is in the cup and half is hanging out of the cup.  Leave the wick in place. You may need to adjust the size of the hole.   If the wick slips out of the cup, you might need to temporarily tape it in place.
  5. Fit the 4oz cup into the top of the 9oz water reservoir.  The wick should be hanging into the water.  If the wick does not touch the water, you will need to adjust it so that it does.

Investigate: Is more fertilizer better for Wisconsin Fast Plants?

Setting up the Growth Cups

  1. The peat pellets should be completely expanded.  Take them out of the water and place them on a paper towl or a plate.  Open the pellets by using your scissors to cut the casing.  
  2. Put peat into each growth cup until they are each half full.  Your wick should now be under the peat as you can see in the diagram.

Adding the Fertilizer

  1. Find the fertilizer pellets.
  2. Put fertilizer pellets on top of the dirt based on the label you put on your cup.  Do not put any pellets in the cup for “No Fertilizer.”  Put three pellets in the “3 Fertilizer” cup.  Put 6 fertilizer pellets in the “6 Fertilizer” cup.  
  3. Use the rest of the peat to fill up the 3 growth cups.  Make sure that all three cups have the same amount of peat.

Planting the Seeds

  1. You should have 6 toothpicks.  Use your markers to color the top of each toothpick a different color.  This is how we will be keeping track of which plant is which.  
  2. You will be planting two seeds in each container.  Use a pencil to make two holes that are 2 cm deep in the peat.  The holes should be at least 2 cm apart from one another.
  3. Drop one seed in each hole.  Cover them lightly with peat.  Mark the location by pushing a toothpick into the soil next to the seed.
  4. Plant two seeds in each growth cup.
  5. Use a plastic sandwich bag to cover the cups, creating a mini-greenhouse.  Place the three growth chambers under a light source.  It will help growth if this is a warm area. 

Tracking the data: Is more fertilizer better for Wisconsin Fast Plants?

You will need to make a data chart for each growth chamber.

Caring for your plant and Measuring Height EVERY TWO DAYS:

Plants take time to grow, so we will need to be patient, although Fast Plants (Brassica rapa) grows quickly, so we will be able to take data on a regular basis.  

  1. You will be watering and measuring the height of your plants in each chamber every two days.
  2. To water, add 2 Tablespoons of water to each chamber.  You will also need to make sure that the water reservior has water up to the line you drew inside the cup.
  3. To measure height, you will need to use a metric ruler. 
  4.  You will be measuring the plant from the level of the soil to the top of the plant.  If your ruler has a border at the zero end, you may need to push your ruler into the soil so that the zero lines up with the soil level.  
  5. You will be measuring height in mm for each plant and record the measurement on your chart.  
  6. You will need to calculate the average for the two plants in each system.                         
    1. Plant 1 Height + Plant 2 Height = Total Height
    2. Total Height ➗ 2 = Average Height
  7. Record the average on your chart.  

SAMPLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extension:  Make a time lapse station
Set up a background paper someplace that you can leave undisturbed.
Place another sheet of paper or a piece of tape on the surface where you will be placing your growth chamber.
You will need to also make a mark on the cup so that you can always place the cup in the same position.
Each day (or every other day) place your cup in the station and take a picture of it.
Put the pictures together using a free app like LapseIt to make a movie!
Share it with us on the Facebook Page!

Pollinating Flowers
At some point, a healthy plant will make a flower.  When your plant makes a flower, it needs to be pollinated in order to make seeds.  If your plant was inside, insects (like bees) would do this for the plant.  Our plants are inside, so you will need to be the pollinator.

  1. You will need one or two cotton swabs to use as a pollination stick.
  2. Very gently and in a circle, rub the tip of the cotton swab in the center of the flower.  This will pick up the pollen.  You may see the yellow pollen on the tip of the cotton swab.
  3. Using the same swab, rub the pollen in the same way on another flower.  
  4. Continue using the same swab on the rest of the flowers, even if they are on other plants.
  5. Store the cotton swab in a plastic bag or cup to use anytime you see new flowers.

Pods and Seeds
Eventually, the pollinated flowers will make seeds.  On the Brassica rapa plant, the seeds are contained in pods.  As the seeds mature, the pods will thicken and elongate.  The number of seeds produced by a plant will tell us how successful the plant has been over its 40 Day life cycle.

  1. On Day 40, remove all of the pods from the plants in your first growth chamber.
  2. Put the pod on a plate or paper towel so that they do not roll away.
  3. Use your fingernails to pry open the pods and reveal the seeds.
  4. Count the number of seeds produced and record it on your data chart.
  5. Repeat this process for each growth chamber.

Conclusions:
Which of your plants was most successful?
Which amount of fertilizer had the plants with the biggest height and largest number of seeds?

What Happened?

Why did we need to set up three different growth chambers?
Whenever we do a science experiment, we follow certain steps to make sure that the experiment will be fair and that it will test what we want it to test. For example: We did an experiment to test how much fertilizer will make our plants grow taller.  We wanted to make sure that our results were just from the amount of fertilizer and not from some other factor.

When we tested the effect of fertilizer on our seeds, we grew a bunch of plants and put different amounts of fertilizer on them. The amount fertilizer is our manipulated variable. All other variables, (amount of watering, location, pot size, seed size) would remain the same and we’d call them constants. They have to stay the same for the experiment to be a fair and accurate test. You can imagine what would happen if we put some of the plants in a closet and the others in the window. The plants in the closet would all die and we’d conclude that it was the amount of fertilizer that killed plants. The responding variable in this experiment was plant growth in centimeters. This variable is what we want to observe and record.

When we do experiments it’s a good idea to do multiple trials, that is, do the same experiment lots of times. When we do multiple trials of the same experiment, we can make sure that our results are consistent and not altered by random events. Multiple trials can be done at one time. This is why we grew two seeds in each growth chamber.

What about the fertilizer?
Just like people, plants need nutrients to grow. In a typical fertilizer, you’ll find lots of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. These primary nutrients help plants grow new cells, and many enable different growth and food production processes to happen. If you choose a good quality fertilizer, it will also contain many other nutrients, including secondary nutrients like calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. Calcium helps plants grow roots and stand up straight. Magnesium helps plants make chlorophyll, which helps plants make food through photosynthesis. Sulfur is an important part of different proteins and plants enzymes. Plants also need very tiny amounts of trace elements like boron, copper, iron, chloride, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc as well.

When we fertilize plants, regular watering is necessary.   The water holds tiny pieces of fertilizer in suspension in the water. The water helps the fertilizer to move through the soil to the seed. It also helps the plant move nutrients around.

Think about it this way: the water in our bodies helps us move nutrients around, and same goes for plants. Plants need water to move nutrients from the soil into the plant. Osmosis is a process in which nutrients move from areas of low concentration to areas of high concentration. This process allows nutrients to move from the soil into the center of a plant’s roots where there are more nutrients.

Once the water and nutrients are inside the xylem tissue of the plant, the xylem acts as a tube that sends the water and nutrients up into the stem. The water molecules connect to each other through a process called adhesion, and as molecules cling together, they move up through the plant. The water becomes a long, cohesive column, and as water moves out of the plant’s leaves when the plant transpires, a new batch of nutrient-carrying water moves upwards.

Water and fertilizer go hand in hand. Allowing nutrients to move through the soil in suspension helps those nutrients move more easily, and it also helps the plant use those nutrients to grow.

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Building a Better Bandage-Engineering https://ibio.org/day-1-title/ https://ibio.org/day-1-title/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 14:30:06 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5590

Materials

For each camper:
4 bandages of different varieties (suggested: fabric bandage, plastic bandage, waterproof bandage)
Knuckle bandage

To share:
Bowl
½ cup of dark liquid (suggested: cold coffee or cola)
Dark powder (suggested: dirt or cocoa powder)
Hand soap
Scissors
Gauze
Gauze Pad
Waterproof medical tape
Waxed paper
Piece of paper
Plastic bag

Introduction

Objectives:
You will conduct a scientific investigation to test a variety of bandages to see which one is the most waterproof. 

You will use what you have learned testing manufactured bandages to design and build your own waterproof bandages.

Time Required:
Part 1: 20 minutes
Part 2: 30 minutes
Part 3: 30 minutes

These estimations may be longer depending on the age of campers and the intensity of your testing.

Remember to take pictures of your bandage designs so that you can share them!

Age Range:
Parts 1-2:  Grades 3-5 with guidance;  Grades 6-8 independent
Part 3: Intended for extension challenge with Grades 5-8

Building a Better Bandage-Engineering

Adapted from Science Scope, Everyday Engineering, “It’s Stuck on You” by Richard H. Moyer and Susan A. Everett

Part A: EXPLORE: How do different bandages compare?

In order to make a good bandage design, you first need to examine the designs of bandages and decide what features are the most important.  What are the features that make the best bandage? You will be testing them out!  Remember, a scientific investigation ensures that the test for each bandage is EXACTLY THE SAME.  Apply the same criteria to each bandage.  This ensures that our results are reliable so that you can trust your results.

Read through the list below.  Choose the features you want to test and come up with some of your own.  If you have the boxes for the bandages, test the claims that are on the boxes.

OVERALL SHAPE SIZE OF GAUZE AIR FLOW
MATERIAL USED FOR TAPE STRETCHINESS WATERPROOFING
STICKINESS OF TAPE TEXTURE DURABILITY
STICKIEST LOCATIONS ABSORBANCY OF GAUZE PROTECTION FROM DIRT

 

Use one data chart for each bandage you test and write the features in the space provided in your data chart.  

Download Data Chart

Observations:Rating:
You will be judging each of the bandages using a scale from 1 to 5.
A rating of 1 means that the feature  has a terrible design.  It makes the bandage a BAD choice.
A rating of 5 means that it has a terrific design.  This is the BEST design for this feature.
Using a rating scale can be tricky.  All of you will have to agree on which rating you will give each type of bandage.  You will also need to explain WHY you have chosen the rating.

Many features will need you to observe.  How do you do this?  You use your senses.  You may TOUCH.  Maybe you will simply LOOK at it.  Some features will need to be SMELLED.  Can you think of a feature that you will LISTEN to?  But…….NO TASTING please!

Apply the bandage on the back of your hand. Inspect the bandage.  Record your observations and rating.

Testing:
Some features will need to be tested.  Some suggestions:

To test waterproofing:  (Save this material for part 2)
Put ½ cup of dark liquid in a bowl.  Dunk or soak the hand with the bandage in the bowl.  Think about how long you should hold your hand in the liquid.  Should you move it around?  How do you remove the bandage so that it is a fair test?  Inspect the condition of the bandage.  If the gauze is tinted brown, it is not waterproof.  Record your observations and rating.

To test stickiness:
Wash the hand with the bandage for 20 seconds using hand soap.  After drying, remove the bandage.  How do you remove the bandage so that it is a fair test?  inspect the condition of the bandage.  Record your observations and rating.

To test absorbency:
Add water, one drop at a time, to the gauze.  Count how many drops of liquid are absorbed into the gauze before it stops holding all of the liquid.

To test protection from dirt:
Get some dirt or cocoa powder.  Rub the hand with the bandage with the material.   How do you remove the bandage so that it is a fair test? Inspect the condition of the bandage.  Record your observations and rating.

Part B: ENGINEER – Design and make a waterproof bandage that WORKS!

Materials:

Here’s what each camper will need to have available:
Gauze
Medical Tape
Waxed Paper
Plastic bag
Scissors
Paper

For testing: (if you did these tests in Part 1, use the same materials)
A bowl
½ cup of dark liquid: room temperature coffee OR room temperature cola
Dirt or cocoa powder
Hand soap
Water

Design:
Use what you have learned to design a waterproof bandage to use on the back of your hand.  Make a written plan and sketch of your design for the waterproof bandage.

Download Data Chart

Test your design, using the SAME Features and rating scale that you used for Part 1.  If you did not test waterproofing, add it to your testing procedure.

Download Data Chart

 

Part C: ENGINEER IMPROVEMENTS – Design and make a waterproof bandage for a KNUCKLE that WORKS!

Materials:

Here’s what each camper will need to have available:
Gauze
Medical Tape
Waxed Paper
Plastic Bag
Scissors
Paper

For testing: (if you did these tests in Part 1, use the same materials)
A bowl
½ cup of dark liquid: room temperature coffee OR room temperature cola
Dirt or cocoa powder
Hand soap
Water

Design:
Use what you have learned to design a waterproof bandage to use on the middle knuckle of your index finger.  Make a written plan and sketch of your design for the waterproof bandage.

Download Data Chart

Test your design, using the SAME Features and rating scale that you used for Part 1.  If you did not test waterproofing, add it to your testing procedure.

Download Data Chart

 

 

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iBIO COVID-19 PPE Response Fund Weekly Update https://ibio.org/ibio-covid-19-ppe-response-fund-weekly-update-5/ Mon, 04 May 2020 12:03:20 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5563 The  response to the March 23rd launch of the iBIO COVID-19 PPE Response Fund has been enthusiastic and heartwarming. Every Monday, we will provide an update on the impact of the Illinois life sciences community and others who are offering their support to our state’s frontline heroes.

To date we have sourced and donated over 130,000 pieces of protective equipment and more than 200,000 supplies needed for COVID-19 diagnostic and testing.

iBIO COVID-19 PPE Response Fund
Donations and Purchases
Last Updated: May 4, 2020

Monetary donations: $1,069,877
Items purchased to date with monetary donations:

  • Goggles: 3,080
  • Protective Clothing: 13,740
  • Gloves: 93,100
  • Surgical Masks: 14,930
  • Testing Swabs: 41,200
  • IR Thermometers: 550

Product donations

  • N95 Masks: 3,620
  • Surgical Masks: 2,430
  • Sanitizer: 2,430
  • Testing Viral Transport Medium: 125,000

To learn more and to make a monetary or unused-medical-product donation, please visit the
iBIO COVD-19 PPE Response Fund.

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Survey: Transitioning to Normal Operations https://ibio.org/survey-transitioning-to-normal-operations/ Fri, 01 May 2020 12:59:32 +0000 https://ibio.org/?p=5555 Businesses are beginning to plan for restoring operations after the state and local restrictions lift at the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the timing of such easing of restrictions is uncertain, planning for business life on the other side of the pandemic now, while there is time, will enable businesses to restore operations more efficiently and effectively

The short survey below will help iBIO identify best practices in the community. We will share the results of this survey with the community. Click here if the survey does not load below.

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